April 18, 2020
by D. P. Story
0 comments

eforms: Studies in Radio Button Fields

Some PDF previewer applications, notably PDF-XChange and
evince, do not handle radio buttons in the same way as do
AA/AR. A PDF viewer may not support PDF forms at all (such as
SumatraPDF), while others, such as TeXworks may supply
the appearances but not the functionality. PDF-XChange
supports PDF forms and Acrobat JavaScript, but handles radio
buttons differently. Continue Reading →

April 4, 2020
by D. P. Story
0 comments

eqexam: Methods of inserting figures

In this article, we survey various methods of incorporating a figure into a problem. There are two placement locations for the figure: (1) in the work area, and (2) in the questions area.

Traditionally (for eqexam documents), the figure is included as part of the work area; these methods has been documented for many years, but will be illustrated here nonetheless. The primary focus of this document is on positioning the figure within the question itself. Continue Reading →

May 31, 2019
by D. P. Story
2 Comments

eforms: Enhanced Preview

Some LaTeX authors use a non-conforming PDF reader as a PDF-previewer, in the same way they use a DVI-previewer. Such non-conforming readers do not necessarily support form fields and the JavaScript they contain. The macro \previewOn has been available for many years, when activated, eforms typesets a rectangular box around a form fields so they become visible to one using a DVI- or PDF-previewer; recently, the eforms package (dated 2019/05/24 or later) supports an enhanced preview. Continue Reading →

April 18, 2018
by D. P. Story
0 comments

aeb_mlink: Crossing page boundaries with multi-line links

With the publication of aeb_mlink dated 2018/04/17 or later comes the ability to create multi-line links that can break across page boundaries. Multi-line links (and single line links for that matter) that break across page boundaries are not supported by the PDF Specification; therefore, for such a link, we crack or break the link into two links, the second one is then free to travel to the next page Continue Reading →

March 3, 2018
by D. P. Story
1 Comment

AeB Pro: \texHelp* and auto-animation

The second in the series on creating a rollover animation. In this demo, we use \texHelp* to create the same animation as in ro-autoanime.pdf, but the animation is not dismissed when the user exits the rollover-word. This enables the user to inspect the animation more leisurely. The aeb_pro package dated 2018/02/17 or later is required. Continue Reading →

March 2, 2018
by D. P. Story
1 Comment

eqexam: The \fillineol command

The \fillineol is similar to the \fillin command, but it calculates the width parameter automatically so the \fillin extends to the end of the line. The eqexam package dated 2018/02/19 or later required.

Update: eqexam package dated 2019/10/29 for the third argument of \fillineol* to have verbatim content.

Download the demo file: fillineol.pdf

September 5, 2017
by D. P. Story
0 comments

Correcting a math problem

The traditional way an math objective question is posed using the exerquiz command \RespBoxMath is to leave a blank text field into which the student enters his or her response to the question. An alternate strategy is to supply an incorrect answer (that looks correct) and to ask the student to edit the answer to obtain a correct answer. Continue Reading →

August 26, 2017
by D. P. Story
0 comments

exerquiz: Multi-letter variables, alternate appearances, and interval repetition

Version 8.0 of exerquiz introduces the features in the title of this article. The \RespBoxMath command allows for multi-letter variables (‘theta’, for example, to represent an angle). Alternate appearances refers to the feature where the variables are replaced by other symbols, when the user leaves the field; for example, ‘theta’ may be replaced with \u03B8, unicode for the Greek letter theta. Interval repetition refer to a new notation [0,1]*3 as a short-hand notation for [0,1]x[0,1]x[0,1].

See the demonstration file ml-vars.pdf

With the latest browser technology, to see the effects of interactive form fields, you must download the file onto your own computer and open it with Adobe Reader.